Not One Drop More

A spring without flow is a stagnant (synonyms: still, motionless, immobile, inert, lifeless, dead, standing, slack, static, stationary, etc.) sinkhole. It is not completely dead but looks and stinks like it is dead. For all intents and purposes, a non- flowing spring has none of the qualities that make Florida’s springs so inspiring, sacred and alive. It is not in the public’s best interest to dry up any of Florida’s artesian springs. Healthy springs support a vast…

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6th Annual Give Springs A Break Recap

This year’s Give Springs A Break (GSAB) event was held at Gissy Springs on the Rainbow River in Dunnellon, FL. Every year, FSI aims to educate young people about Florida’s springs through the GSAB program. With the support of First Magnitude Brewing Company, we were able to plan another home run event, attracting over 50 college students and young professionals from all over the state. GSAB participants spent four days and three nights camping at the springs.…

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Save Our Springs: Mermaid Gala

On May 18th, over 160 supporters gathered at the UF Austin Carey Center to celebrate springs at FSI's annual Save Our Springs Mermaid Gala. The evening kicked off with cocktails, mermaids, and an exploration of the silent auction and beautiful venue. Following a buffet dinner provided by Sweetwater Branch Inn, FSI Executive Director, Dr. Robert Knight, welcomed the crowd and passed the mic to photographer John Moran, who provided an introduction of the evening's keynote speaker, award-winning…

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Death by a Thousand Cuts

Two weeks ago as I was reading the Gainesville Sun a small note on the Classified page shouted out to me: “Public Notice – The Suwannee River Water Management District (District) intends to issue a Water Use Permit for a maximum of 150,000 gallons per day in Alachua County for row crops and cattle watering. Affected parties can obtain a copy of the Technical Staff Report by writing the District.” Having recently compiled a list of well…

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Springs Outing: Remarkable Karst Features Near High Springs

The May 2019 FSI outing explored three distinct and impressive karst features all located within five miles of the Florida Springs Institute High Springs office, including:  the Santa Fe River Rise in O’Leno State Park; Scrubtown Sink, a giant sinkhole used as a dump; and a little known Ichetucknee-like karst valley with an extinct headspring, rocky walls, caves, and park-quality forest. We started the day at the rather unspectacular River Rise, which is the second largest dark…

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